Thursday, January 6, 2011

Big Brother really can see everything: American Air Force surveillance drone will track movement across an entire town

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 8:46 PM on 3rd January 2011
A revolutionary new American Air Force drone will be able to track movement of insurgents in Afghanistan across entire towns.
Named Gordon Stare, it is set to be used in the country within the next few months and will be able to transmit live video of movement.
The new system will use a series of nine cameras on the remote controlled aircraft and will be able to send up to 65 images at any one time.
Revolutionary: The new Gorgon Stare surveillance system will be mounted on MQ-9 Reaper drones and track insurgents' movements across entire towns
Revolutionary: The new Gorgon Stare surveillance system will be mounted on MQ-9 Reaper drones and track insurgents' movements across entire towns
Ground staff will be able to receive real-time broadcasts of the clips, and able to transfer and store data for further analysis at a later date.
The system will be deployed on board the MQ-9 Reaper drone that currently undertakes surveillance using a single mounted camera that relays information to analysts on the ground.
Major General James O. Poss, the American Air Force's assistant deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance said the new tool will have benefits  in the search for terrorists in the country.
Major General Poss told the Washington Post: 'Gorgon Stare will be looking at a whole city, so there will be no way for the adversary to know what we're looking at, and we can see everything.'
'With the new tool, analysts will no longer have to guess where to point the camera.'
However critics of the system say that the huge amount of information the new drone will receive will be of limited value if they cannot match it with ground intelligence.
They also add that the military does not have the manpower to go through imagery the drones will provide.
Gorgon Stare has been in development for around 18 months and its release coincides with a huge increase in aerial surveillance in Afghanistan, which has doubled since January 2010.

No comments: